M-J’s Instructions for Making Brioche

 M-J de Mesterton’s Original Brioche Recipe in Pictures
©Copyright April 30th, 2011
Six eggs plus one egg-yolk, five or six cups of unbleached flour, one teaspoon of honey, one teaspoon of sugar, one half-teaspoon of salt, one half-cup of warmed buttermilk, one heaping teaspoonful of yeast, and two sticks of butter are M-J’s ingredients for brioche. For a finishing egg-wash, you will need a seventh egg and a pastry-brush. Her recipe makes six brioches à tetes and eight full-sized hamburger buns. You will need a stand-mixer with a dough-hook to make M-J’s brioche recipe.
Mix warmed buttermilk with yeast, add one egg, one cup of flour and the teaspoon of honey. Mix well and cover with another cup of flour. Let rise uncovered for thirty or forty minutes, until the sponge is two or more times its original size and its surface resembles cracked earth.
Adding brioche ingredients is a gradual procedure.
Begin adding flour, eggs, sugar, salt and room-temperature butter cut into small sections, in alternate measures, gradually, in the bowl of a stand-mixer. Beat the brioche dough with your dough-hook attachment until it pulls away from the side of the machine’s metal bowl. Turn off the stand-mixer motor now and then to let it cool off a bit. Mind the mixer as it goes through its paces, because with this vigorous dough-beating it will inevitably move across the work-surface. Ideally, you will beat the brioche dough for thirty minutes. The French word, “brioche” refers to this process.
This is the proper texture for brioche dough. This batch is almost finished being beaten after twenty minutes. Notice the sides of the bowl; they are almost cleaned of sticky dough by the slapping motion of the process. The dough is allowed to rest for a few minutes while the stand-mixer motor cools off a little. Ten more minutes of beating will follow.
It is now time to unplug the stand-mixer, raise its head, remove its dough-hook, and then, grabbing the machine to stabilise it, bump the stationery bowl out of position with the heel of your hand against its handle. Your brioche dough can now be left to rise in this stainless steel bowl, covered loosely with plastic-wrap.
M-J’s Brioche Dough Rising
After the brioche dough has risen to two times its original size, you may punch it down and form it into shapes. M-J usually lets hers rise a second time before finally shaping the brioches à tetes and hamburger buns. Once your brioche dough is in a baking- pan, let it rise to double the original size. Then use your seventh whole egg to create a final coating of egg-wash, by mixing it with a half-teaspoon of water and brushing the brioche tops with it, using a pastry-brush. 
Because of their high butter-content, greasing pans will not be necessary. Bake your pans of brioches on the center-rack a medium-hot oven (375 Fahrenheit) for about twenty minutes. The time and temperature of baking will depend upon the conditions where you live, and the phase of the moon, therefore you must keep a close-eye on the brioche while it is baking. Lower the heat to 350F if their bottoms or tops begin to darken unevenly. Serve the brioche after it has cooled for at least ten minutes. If you are serving them the next day, these gems will benefit from being warmed in the oven first. Keeping the dough for more than one day in the refrigerator will sour its taste considerably in an undesirable way. However, brioche dough freezes well. 
©M-J de Mesterton 2011
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Elegant, Economical Swedish Meatballs

An elegant way to stretch your meat budget in these austere times is to make Swedish or Scandinavian-style meatballs. Each household cook has his or her recipe, but the basics are ground meat such as beef, veal and/or pork mixed with bread crumbs or bits of bread (I use bits of brioche pulled out from my brioche hamburger buns, which have been reserved in a freezer-bag), an egg and some cream or milk.  Finely-minced onion is optional. Spices include nutmeg and/or allspice, salt and optional white pepper. Onion powder can take the place of minced onion, or that flavour may be omitted altogether. Meat mixtures are shaped into small balls and rolled in flour, then fried in butter. A pan-gravy is made while the finished meatballs rest in a warm oven until serving time. I prefer to use ground beef, brioche bits, sour cream, minced onions or onion-powder, nutmeg, salt and white or green ground pepper.
©M-J de Mesterton 2011

Serve Swedish meatballs with new potatoes and perhaps a little lingonberry or cranberry sauce on the side.
This Danish baking-dish has the traditional cream gravy at its bottom, topped with the meatballs (this type of meatball recipe is found in Swedish, Danish and Finnish cookbooks).
Very small new potatoes are usually just boiled in salted water, and not cut into pieces.
These Yukon Gold new potatoes have been cut and boiled, then sautéed in butter and smashed lightly.
©M-J de Mesterton 2011

Gevalia Kaffe at American Markets

 


Kraft Foods corporation have chosen to market Gevalia, the favourite coffee of Sweden, known for its traditional medium-roast. The Swedes’ own Gevalia Kaffe brand will be available this summer at more than 20,000 retailers throughout the United States.
Gevalia, a $400 million-dollar global mail-order Swedish brand, has long had a following in the U.S.A. “Gevalia is known and loved by millions who’ve purchased it online because it delivers on its promise of rich, smooth taste that’s never bitter,” said Domenic Borrelli, Vice President of Kraft’s U.S. coffee-branch. “We’re telling retailers the good news now. And, we’re confident the convenience of being able to purchase Gevalia in stores will attract and delight an entirely new audience of discriminating coffee lovers.”
Kraft Foods has a $5 billion global coffee-purveying business, which includes the  French brand Carte Noire and Jacobs from Germany.

Kraft said that Swedes drink more coffee than citizens in almost any other country (rivaling Finland, another Scandinavian country), adding that Gevalia Kaffe is the top Swedish coffee brand. Gevalia is the official coffee of the Swedish Royal Court.
In my opinion, having drunk Gevalia Kaffe for half of my life, it is the natural antidote for popular over-roasted varieties that seem to all taste the same (Starbucks’ wide variety of dark roasts that are indistinguishable from one another comes to mind, all naturally-occurring flavours having been systematically burnt out of existence). The current coffee monotony will soon be passé. Americans will soon be able to taste real, high-quality coffee without establishing a mail-order contract with Gevalia. That is great news for coffee-connoisseurs!
©M-J de Mesterton 2011


Gevalia Kaffe Coming to American Market

Gevalia Kaffe Traditional Swedish Roast, an Ideal Medium-Brown Grind  that Has a Classic Aroma and Taste

Kraft Foods has chosen to market Gevalia, the favourite coffee of Sweden, known for its traditional medium-roast. The Swedes’ own Gevalia Kaffe brand will be available this summer at more than 20,000 retailers throughout the United States.
Gevalia, a $400 million-dollar global mail-order Swedish brand, has long had a following in the U.S.A. “Gevalia is known and loved by millions who’ve purchased it online because it delivers on its promise of rich, smooth taste that’s never bitter,” said Domenic Borrelli, Vice President of Kraft’s U.S. coffee-branch. “We’re telling retailers the good news now. And, we’re confident the convenience of being able to purchase Gevalia in stores will attract and delight an entirely new audience of discriminating coffee lovers.”
Kraft Foods has a $5 billion global coffee-purveying business, which includes the  French brand Carte Noire and Jacobs from Germany.

Kraft said that Swedes drink more coffee than citizens in almost any other country (rivaling Finland, another Scandinavian country), adding that Gevalia Kaffe is the top Swedish coffee brand. Gevalia is the official coffee of the Swedish Royal Court.
In my opinion, having drunk Gevalia Kaffee for half of my life, it is the natural antidote for popular over-roasted varieties that seem to all taste the same (Starbucks’ wide variety of dark roasts that are indistinguishable from one another comes to mind, all naturally-occurring flavours having been systematically burnt out of existence). Americans will soon be able to taste real, high-quality coffee without establishing a mail-order contract with Gevalia. The monotony will soon be passé. That is great news for coffee-connoisseurs!

©M-J de Mesterton 2011